Medics and patient

Transitioning from General Pediatric to Adult-Oriented Inpatient Care: National Survey of US Children's Hospitals.

Transitioning from General Pediatric to Adult-Oriented Inpatient Care: National Survey of US Children's Hospitals.

Hospital charges and lengths of stay may be greater when adults with chronic conditions are admitted to children's hospitals. Despite multiple efforts to improve pediatric-adult healthcare transitions, little guidance exists for transitioning inpatient care. In this study, HIP Investigator Dr. Ryan Coller et al. sought to characterize pediatric-adult inpatient care transitions across general pediatric services at US children's hospitals.

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young boy patient

Complex Care Hospital Use and Postdischarge Coaching: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Complex Care Hospital Use and Postdischarge Coaching: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Complex care programs seek to influence key health outcomes for children with medical complexity (CMC), and investment in program infrastructure is often justified by anticipating savings from lower health care use. HIP Investigator, Dr. Ryan Coller et al. sought to examine the effect of a caregiver coaching intervention, Plans for Action and Care Transitions (PACT), on hospital use among children with medical complexity (CMC) within a complex care medical home. Among CMC within a complex care program, a health coaching intervention designed to identify, prevent, and manage patient-specific crises and postdischarge transitions appears to lower hospitalizations and charges.

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Stethoscope and chart

Asset-Based Community Development as a Strategy for Developing Local Global Health Curricula.

Asset-Based Community Development as a Strategy for Developing Local Global Health Curricula.

A significant and growing proportion of US children have immigrant parents, an issue of increasing importance to pediatricians. Training globally minded pediatric residents to address health inequities related to globalization is an important reason to expand educational strategies around local global health (LGH). HIP Investigator, Dr. Ryan Coller et al. developed a curriculum in the pediatric global health residency track at UW to address gaps in LGH education and to increase resident knowledge about local health disparities for global community members.

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Doctor with patient

Inpatient Portals for Hospitalized Patients and Caregivers: A Systematic Review.

Inpatient Portals for Hospitalized Patients and Caregivers: A Systematic Review.

Patient portals, web-based personal health records linked to electronic health records (EHRs), provide patients access to their healthcare information and facilitate communication with providers. A team of authors, including HIP Investigator Dr. Ryan Coller, conducted a systematic review of the literature evaluating the design, use, and impact of inpatient portals, which are patient portals designed to give hospitalized patients and caregivers inpatient EHR clinical information for the purpose of engaging them in hospital care.

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Medical students in front of laptop

Broadening Medical Students' Exposure to the Range of Illness Experiences: A Pilot Curriculum Focused on Depression Education

Broadening Medical Students' Exposure to the Range of Illness Experiences: A Pilot Curriculum Focused on Depression Education

Exposing medical students to a broad range of illness experiences is crucial for teaching them to practice patient-centered care, but students often have limited interaction with patients with diverse illness presentations. In this pilot, Dr. Rachel Grob et. al developed, implemented, and evaluated a self-directed online curriculum followed by a small group discussion focused on depression education. The curriculum was based on a module created using the Database of Individual Patients’ Experiences methodology.

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Woman talking to young boy

Content validity of the PROMIS® family relationships measure for children with chronic illness

Content validity of the PROMIS® family relationships measure for children with chronic illness

Elizabeth D. Cox, MD, PhD and colleagues recently published new findings about the content validity of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System® (PROMIS®) Family Relationships measure in the journal, Health and Quality of Life Outcomes.  This NIH-funded study used qualitative methods to assess whether this new patient-reported outcome measure reflects the experiences of children with chronic conditions.  The authors found that the Family Relationships measure, which had been developed and validated in a general pediatric population, does capture the experience of family relationships for chronically ill children.  For the study, over 30 children with asthma, sickle cell disease, or type 1 diabetes and their parents were interviewed about their family experiences and the impact of chronic illness on those relationships. Interviewees described their family relationships in a manner consistent with the facets of the PROMIS® metric.  Findings suggest potential utility for this metric in research and clinical practice with chronically ill children and their families. 

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Doctor talking to patient and writing down notes

Sociodemographics and hypertension control among young adults

Sociodemographics and hypertension control among young adults

Young adults ages 18-39 have low hypertension control rates compared to young adults. Using electronic health record data, Dr. Heather Johnson et al. evaluated the role of sociodemographic factors in hypertension control among young adults with primary care access and incident hypertension. They found that young men had a 39% lower rate of hypertension control compared to young women, and that people for whom English was not their primary language and unmarried people also had lower control rates.

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Girl in hospital bed with oxygen mask

Hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions among children with chronic and complex diseases

Hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions among children with chronic and complex diseases

Ambulatory-care sensitive (ACS) hospitalizations are those in which high quality outpatient care could have potentially prevented the need for hospitalization. In this study, Dr. Ryan Coller et al. evaluated ACS hospitalizations for children with non-complex chronic diseases and children with medical complexity, and sought to identify ambulatory care predictors of ACS hospitalizations. The authors found that among children with non-complex chronic diseases, 14.6% of hospitalizations were ACS hospitalizations and ACS hospitalizations were more likely with no outpatient visits in the prior year and less likely with timely well checks and phone encounters in the month before the admission. Among children with medical complexity, 5.3% of hospitalizations were ACS hospitalizations, and provider continuity was associated with fewer ACS hospitalizations.

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blood pressure measurement

The importance of frequent return visits and hypertension control among young adults

The importance of frequent return visits and hypertension control among young adults

This study by Cecile King and several HIP investigators evaluated the relationship between ambulatory blood pressure encounter intervals and hypertension control rates among young adults. A retrospective analysis showed that shorter encounter intervals were associated with higher hypertension control. Young adults with more frequent visits also had lower medication initiation, supporting the effectiveness of lifestyle modifications.

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Young adult browsing the web

MyHEART: Development & dissemination of a patient-centered website for young adults with hypertension

MyHEART: Development & dissemination of a patient-centered website for young adults with hypertension

In this article, Dr. Heather Johnson and team discuss the development of the MyHEART website and toolkit for young adults with hypertension. The website and toolkit were implemented successfully with input from community and healthcare stakeholders to provide evidence-based education to a hard-to-reach population.

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