Female doctor consulting young patient

Investigating lupus retention in care to inform interventions for disparities reduction: an observational cohort study

Investigating lupus retention in care to inform interventions for disparities reduction: an observational cohort study

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that disproportionately impacts young women, patients of color, and the socioeconomically disadvantaged, making SLE an important target for health disparity measurement and research. HIP Investigator, Dr. Christie Bartels et al. applied WHO-endorsed metrics that helped reduce similar disparities in HIV to investigate relationships between race, disadvantage, and retention in care in an urban lupus cohort. The authors examined predictors of lupus retention in care, developed an SLE Care Continuum, and informed interventions to reduce disparities. Key findings include 40% of patients not being retained at one year, and neighborhood disadvantage was the leading predictor of retention gaps.

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Small-Group, Community-Member Intervention for Urinary and Bowel Incontinence: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Small-Group, Community-Member Intervention for Urinary and Bowel Incontinence: A Randomized Controlled Trial

More than 60% of older U.S. women suffer from urinary incontinence, bowel incontinence, or both, the annual cost of which exceeds $30 billion. In addition to significant negative effect on quality of life and depression,2 incontinence increases risk for institutionalization. HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. evaluated the effects of Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder, a small-group intervention, on urinary and bowel incontinence symptoms among older women with incontinence.

The authors found that participation in a small-group intervention improves symptoms of both urinary and bowel incontinence in older women. Mind Over Matter is a feasible model with potential to bring effective behavioral solutions to the community.

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Learn more about Mind Over Matter

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Anxiety and Hypertension: Is There a Link? A Literature Review of the Comorbidity Relationship Between Anxiety and Hypertension

Anxiety and Hypertension: Is There a Link? A Literature Review of the Comorbidity Relationship Between Anxiety and Hypertension

There is increasing evidence of a positive association between comorbid anxiety and hypertension. This contemporaneous review by HIP Investigator, Dr. Heather Johnson supports similar findings in historical studies and provides mechanistic hypotheses for larger, longitudinal studies. The objective of this review is to summarize contemporaneous studies evaluating the relationship between prevalent anxiety and comorbid prevalent hypertension, or the development of incident (future) hypertension.

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HIP Model

A practical model for research with learning health systems: Building and implementing effective complex case management

A practical model for research with learning health systems: Building and implementing effective complex case management

For researchers to contribute meaningfully to the creation of learning health systems, practical tools are required to operationalize existing conceptual frameworks. A team of authors including HIP Investigators, Dr. Maureen Smith and Dr. Menggang Yu describe a model currently in use by the University of Wisconsin Health Innovation Program (HIP). The HIP model consolidates and enhances existing learning health system frameworks by defining specific steps needed to create sustainable change based on research conducted within the health system.

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View the HIP Model and Tools for Research with Learning Health Systems

View the Case Management Case Management Benefit Scoring System Toolkit

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Evaluating Integrated Care for Children: A Clarion Call or a Call for Clarity?

Evaluating Integrated Care for Children: A Clarion Call or a Call for Clarity?

“Integrated care” is often used to describe concepts such as coordinated and seamless care instead of the often fragmented and episodic care that patients receive. Integrated care reflects the aspirations of modern health care systems and receives significant academic attention. Authors Dr. Eyal Cohen and HIP Investigator, Dr. Ryan Coller conducted a broad search strategy to identify randomized controlled trials comparing integrated care with usual care.

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Reliability and validity of PROMIS® pediatric family relationships short form in children 8-17 years of age with chronic disease

Reliability and validity of PROMIS® pediatric family relationships short form in children 8-17 years of age with chronic disease

Families play a key role in managing pediatric chronic illness. The PROMIS® pediatric family relationships measure was developed primarily within the general pediatric population. HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox et al. evaluated the Family Relationships short form in the context of pediatric chronic diseases and presented their findings as to whether the Family Relationships measure demonstrates adequate reliability and validity when applied in a clinical population of chronically ill children and their parents.

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Holding hands

Fused comparative intervention scoring for heterogeneity of longitudinal intervention effects

Fused comparative intervention scoring for heterogeneity of longitudinal intervention effects

With the growing cost of health care in the United States, the need to improve efficiency and efficacy has become increasingly urgent. There has been a keen interest in developing interventions to effectively coordinate the typically fragmented care of patients with many comorbidities. Evaluation of such interventions is often challenging given their long-term nature and their differential effectiveness among different patients. Furthermore, care coordination interventions are often highly resource-intensive. Hence there is pressing need to identify which patients would benefit the most from a care coordination program. In this work, Dr. Jared Huling and HIP Investigators Dr. Menggang Yu and Dr. Maureen Smith introduced a subgroup identification procedure for long-term interventions whose effects are expected to change smoothly over time.

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Eye doctor

Diabetic Retinopathy Assessment Variability Among Eye Care Providers in an Urban Teleophthalmology Program

Diabetic Retinopathy Assessment Variability Among Eye Care Providers in an Urban Teleophthalmology Program

Teleophthalmology is an evidence-based method for diabetic eye screening. It is unclear whether the type of eye care provider performing teleophthalmology interpretation produces significant variability. While teleophthalmology has become increasingly accepted for diabetic eye screening in primary care settings, the availability of adequately trained, qualified readers may limit its widespread implementation. HIP Investigator, Dr. Yao Liu et al. assessed grading variability between an optometrist, general ophthalmologist, and retinal specialist using images from an urban, diabetic retinopathy teleophthalmology program.

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Rationale and study design of the MyHEART study: A young adult hypertension self-management randomized controlled trial

Rationale and study design of the MyHEART study: A young adult hypertension self-management randomized controlled trial

To address the unmet need in hypertensive care for young adults, we developed MyHEART (My Hypertension Education And Reaching Target), a multi-component, theoretically-based intervention designed to achieve self-management among young adults with uncontrolled hypertension. MyHEART is a patient-centered program, based upon the Self-Determination Theory, that uses evidence-based health behavior approaches to lower blood pressure. Therefore, HIP Investigator, Dr. Heather Johnson and a team of investigators including Dr. Maureen Smith, evaluated MyHEART's impact on changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure compared to usual care after 6 and 12 months in 310 geographically and racially/ethnically diverse young adults with uncontrolled hypertension.

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Eye appointment

Identification of barriers, facilitators and system-based implementation strategies to increase teleophthalmology use for diabetic eye screening in a rural US primary care clinic

Identification of barriers, facilitators and system-based implementation strategies to increase teleophthalmology use for diabetic eye screening in a rural US primary care clinic

Teleophthalmology for diabetic eye screening is an evidence-based intervention substantially underused in US multipayer primary care clinics, even when equipment and trained personnel are readily available. HIP Investigator, Dr. Yao Liu et al. sought to identify patient and primary care provider (PCP) barriers, facilitators, as well as strategies to increase teleophthalmology use. The team of authors conducted standardised open-ended, individual interviews and analysed the transcripts using both inductive and directed content analysis to identify barriers and facilitators to teleophthalmology use.

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