Emergency Department

Maggots, Mucous and Monkey Meat: Does Disgust Sensitivity Affect Case Mix Seen During Residency?

Maggots, Mucous and Monkey Meat: Does Disgust Sensitivity Affect Case Mix Seen During Residency?

Emergency physicians encounter scenarios daily that many would consider “disgusting.” While emergency physicians may have lower disgust sensitivity overall, it is not known whether individual differences in disgust sensitivity impact clinical performance during residency.

A group of authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Brian Patterson, wrote this article that determines whether emergency physicians with higher disgust sensitivity see fewer “disgusting” cases during training.

Read more

Senior women in classroom

Reasons Behind Preferences for Community-Based Continence Promotion

Reasons Behind Preferences for Community-Based Continence Promotion

More than 60% of women older than 65 years in the United States have urinary or bowel incontinence. Despite the existence of effective, minimally invasive therapies, more than half of women with urinary incontinence and two-thirds of women with bowel incontinence do not seek medical care.

In this study, HIP Investigator Dr. Heidi Brown et al. sought to understand sought to understand the potential reach of 3 continence promotion formats: a single lecture, an interactive 3-session workshop, and an online program. Authors found that most incontinent women are willing to participate in continence promotion, especially online.

Read more

Two people in coffee shop

Social Media Posts by Recreational Marijuana Companies and Administrative Code Regulations in Washington State

Social Media Posts by Recreational Marijuana Companies and Administrative Code Regulations in Washington State

The state of Washington passed Initiative Measure No. 502 in 2012, which legalized recreational marijuana use for persons older than 21 years. The legalization of recreational marijuana may increase the exposure of youths to and influence from messages promoting marijuana use. A team of authors, including HIP Investigator Dr. Elizabeth Cox evaluated the adherence to WAC regulations among the social media business pages of recreational marijuana companies in the state of Washington.

Read the article

Diabetes monitoring tools

Stratifying patients with diabetes into clinically relevant groups by combination of chronic conditions

Stratifying patients with diabetes into clinically relevant groups by combination of chronic conditions

Dr. Elizabeth Magnan et al. looked at combinations of chronic conditions among patients with diabetes to examine their relationships with diabetes quality metrics. They analyzed 12 conditions concordant with diabetes care to define classes based on co-occurrence: severe cardiac, cardiac, noncardiac vascular, risk factors, and no concordant comorbidities. Patients had distinct quality metric achievement by condition class, and patients in less sever chronic condition classes were less likely to achieve diabetes metrics.

Read the article

Chronic diseases

The impact of a patient's concordant and discordant chronic conditions on diabetes care quality measures

The impact of a patient's concordant and discordant chronic conditions on diabetes care quality measures

Dr. Elizabeth Magnan et al. sought to determine the impact of the number of concordant and discordant chronic conditions on diabetes care quality. Using EHR data, authors found that a higher number of concordant conditions were associated with higher odds of achieving testing and control goals for all outcomes except blood pressure control. Having more concordant conditions makes diabetes care goal achievement more likely.

Read the article

Blood sugar monitor and pills

Establishing chronic condition concordance and discordance with diabetes

Establishing chronic condition concordance and discordance with diabetes

This study by Dr. Elizabeth Magnan et al. aimed to determine which chronic conditions are concordant and discordant with diabetes care. Using the Delphi technique, the study team surveyed PCPs in an academic practice. They found 12 conditions were concordant with diabetes care and 50 were discordant, and 31 of the discordant conditions did not overlap with any of the diabetes care goals. This study adds information that may prove useful in developing multimorbidity guidelines and interventions.

Read the article

Reviewing a report

Publicly reported quality-of-care measures influenced Wisconsin physician groups to improve performance

Publicly reported quality-of-care measures influenced Wisconsin physician groups to improve performance

Investigators analyzed 14 publicly reported quality of care ambulatory measures for the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality to learn whether the reports impact quality of care for patients. Physician groups in the collaborative improved their performance during the study period and when surveyed, reported that the public measures motivated them to act on some, but not all, of the quality measures. 

Read the article

Graphs and phone

Public reporting helped drive quality improvement in outpatient diabetes care among Wisconsin physician groups

Public reporting helped drive quality improvement in outpatient diabetes care among Wisconsin physician groups

This Health Affairs article by Dr. Maureen Smith et al. examined how physician groups respond to public reporting. The authors found that publicly reported metrics, along with participation in large or externally sponsored projects, increased a clinic's implementation of diabetes improvement interventions. Accountability metrics should be structured to capture incremental improvements in quality to reward early and ongoing improvement activities. 

Read the article

Blood sugar test

Analysis of guidelines for screening diabetes mellitus in an ambulatory population

Analysis of guidelines for screening diabetes mellitus in an ambulatory population

This study compared the case-finding ability of current national guidelines for screening diabetes mellitus and characterized factors that affect testing practices in an ambulatory population. In this retrospective analysis, investigators found that compared with the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommendations, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) guidelines result in a lower number of patients eligible for screening and decreased case-finding significantly. The number and type of risk factors predict diabetes, and lack of health insurance decreases testing.

Read the article