Sick senior woman fallen

Comparing Strategies for Identifying Falls in Older Adult Emergency Department Visits Using EHR Data

Comparing Strategies for Identifying Falls in Older Adult Emergency Department Visits Using EHR Data

Emergency department (ED) visits for falls among older adults are often sentinel events for poor health trajectories; however, challenges exist in defining fall‐related visits in the ED. Authors including HIP Investigators Dr. Brian Patterson and Dr. Maureen Smith developed and validated a simple rules‐based Natural language processing system that accurately identified falls from the text of ED physician notes.

The goal of the study was to compare performance characteristics of several fall identification strategies using EHR data from ED visits using manual chart abstraction as a gold standard.

Read the article

Burned out physician

Physician Burnout and Timing of Electronic Health Record Use

Physician Burnout and Timing of Electronic Health Record Use

Burnout among primary care physicians is a major problem in the United States. In addition to negatively impacting physician health, burnout is also associated with reduced quality of patient care and increased physician turnover, further contributing to health care costs and the shortage of physicians.

The PATH group conducted a study to determine the association between physician burnout and timing of EHR use in an academic internal medicine primary care practice. The group hypothesized that increased time spent in the EHR, particularly outside of normal work-hours, would be associated with higher levels of burnout.

Read the article

Learn more about PATH

Senior woman talking to lecturer

After the Randomized Trial: Implementation of Community-Based Continence Promotion in the Real World

After the Randomized Trial: Implementation of Community-Based Continence Promotion in the Real World

Most women aged 65 and older have incontinence, associated with high healthcare costs, institutionalization, and negative quality of life, but few seek care. Mind over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder (MOM) is a small-group self-management workshop, led by a trained facilitator in a community setting, proven to improve incontinence in older women.

The main objective of the study by HIP Investigator, Dr. Heidi Brown et al. was to quantify and understand barriers to and facilitators of implementation, adoption, and maintenance of the MOM intervention. The secondary objective was to engage study communities and WIHA staff in the development of a partner‐focused implementation package for MOM.

Read the article

Learn more about Mind Over Matter

Group of doctors  meeting

Priorities and Outcomes for Youth-Adult Transitions in Hospital Care: Perspectives of Inpatient Clinical Leaders at US Children's Hospitals

Priorities and Outcomes for Youth-Adult Transitions in Hospital Care: Perspectives of Inpatient Clinical Leaders at US Children's Hospitals

Adults with chronic conditions originating in childhood experience ongoing hospitalizations; however, efforts to guide youth-adult transitions rarely address transitioning to adult-oriented inpatient care. A group of authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Ryan Coller identified the perceptions of clinical leaders on important and feasible inpatient transition activities and outcomes, including when, how, and for whom inpatient transition processes are needed.

Authors found that children's hospital clinical leaders rated inpatient youth-adult transition activities and outcome measures as important and feasible; however, feasibility may ultimately drive implementation.

Read the article

Child in hospital with IV

The Intersection of Complex Care and Hospital Medicine: Opportunities to Advance Health for Chronically Ill Populations

The Intersection of Complex Care and Hospital Medicine: Opportunities to Advance Health for Chronically Ill Populations

Children with medical complexity (CMC) are a high-need, high-cost population representing 1% of all children yet accounting for nearly one-third of all child health-related costs. Parents of CMC take responsibility for the vast majority of caregiving and face many challenges in doing so. Caregivers themselves experience physical and mental health problems that can compromise their ability to effectively perform caregiving tasks. Additionally, direct clinical encounters for CMC in health care settings are often inefficient and poorly coordinated.

Pediatric hospitalists have an essential role to play in the development of innovative solutions to improve care for CMC. In response, hospitalists have been integral in refining and studying structured complex care programs for CMC. In this article, HIP Investigator, Dr. Ryan Coller et al. evaluated complex care program efforts to improve care for CMC.

Read the article

Group of doctors looking at tablet

Codesign and Usability Testing of a Mobile Application to Support Family-Delivered Enteral Tube Care

Codesign and Usability Testing of a Mobile Application to Support Family-Delivered Enteral Tube Care

Enteral tubes are prevalent among children with medical complexity (CMC), and complications can lead to costly health care use. Using a human-centered codesign process, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Ryan Coller, created a highly usable mobile application to support enteral tube caregiving at home. Future work involves evaluating the feasibility of longitudinal use and effectiveness in improving self-efficacy and reduce device complications.

Read the article

Daily medications

Workflow Barriers and Strategies to Reduce Antibiotic Overuse in Nursing Homes

Workflow Barriers and Strategies to Reduce Antibiotic Overuse in Nursing Homes

Antibiotics are among the most commonly prescribed medications in nursing homes (NHs), being prescribed to two‐thirds of residents annually. Although often beneficial, their overuse is associated with avoidable adverse effects.

This article by HIP Investigator, Dr. Edmond Ramly et al. seeks to characterize the workflows performed in NHs before a prescriberʼs decision to prescribe antibiotics. By analyzing the preprescribing workflow across NHs, authors sought to identify barriers to reducing antibiotic overuse and strategies to address them to improve antibiotic prescribing.

Read the article

Doctor consulting her female patient

Implementing parity for mental health and substance use treatment in Medicaid

Implementing parity for mental health and substance use treatment in Medicaid

Rates of mental health and substance use disorders (MHSUDs) in the adult Medicaid population are higher than for adults with Medicare or private health insurance. In this publication, HIP Investigator, Dr. Marguerite Burns et al. estimates the association between the implementation of parity in coverage for mental health and substance use disorder (MHSUD) services within the Medicaid program and MHSUD service use.

The author’s findings suggest that parity implementation in Medicaid could increase access to effective MHSUD services in a high‐need population.

Read the article

Little girl hugging teddy bear

Ambulatory Quality, Special Health Care Needs, and Emergency Department or Hospital Use for US Children

Ambulatory Quality, Special Health Care Needs, and Emergency Department or Hospital Use for US Children

Hospital and emergency department (ED) visits are measures of health and chronic disease control. Reducing hospital and ED use is a family‐centered goal and can lower health care spending. However, a key unknown is whether and how ambulatory care quality predicts ED and hospital utilization in children by underlying chronic illness. HIP Investigator, Dr. Ryan Coller et al. sought to identify associations between parent‐reported ambulatory care quality and pediatric ED or hospital visits and evaluated how these relationships vary among children with different levels of medical complexity.

Read the article

Bandaging amputee

Expect Delays: Poor Connections Between Rural and Urban Health Systems Challenge Multidisciplinary Care for Rural Americans With Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Expect Delays: Poor Connections Between Rural and Urban Health Systems Challenge Multidisciplinary Care for Rural Americans With Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Over 30 million people in the United States have diabetes, and up to 25% of them will develop a diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). Specific to DFUs, rural patients face 50% higher odds of major (above-ankle) amputation and 40% higher odds of death compared to their urban counterparts. A group of authors including HIP Investigators, Dr. Meghan Brennan and Dr. Christie Bartels sought to understand what health system factors contribute to the rural disparity in diabetic foot ulcer outcomes.

The authors concluded that future interventions focusing on mitigating the poor connections across rural and urban healthcare systems could reduce the rural disparity in major amputations.

Read the article

Pages