Patient and doctor discussion

Patients' roles in governance of learning: Results from a qualitative study of 16 learning healthcare systems

Patients' roles in governance of learning: Results from a qualitative study of 16 learning healthcare systems

Patient and family engagement has been identified as key to fulfilling Learning Healthcare Systems (LHSs) promise as a model for improving clinical care, catalyzing research, and controlling costs. Little is known, however, about the state of patient engagement in the learning mission of these systems or about what governance structures and processes facilitate such engagement.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Rachel Grob conducted a qualitative analysis of how patients and family members are engaged in the governance of systematic learning at 16 purposively sampled LHSs based on telephone interviews with 20 patient/family leaders and 79 employee leaders.

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Girl in wheelchair

Stakeholder Perspectives in Anticipation of Sharing Physicians’ Notes With Parents of Hospitalized Children

Stakeholder Perspectives in Anticipation of Sharing Physicians’ Notes With Parents of Hospitalized Children

Sharing honest, unbiased health information with parents is endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics as an important way to improve the quality and safety of pediatric care. To increase information transparency, a growing number of hospitals have adopted inpatient portals, online applications on tablet computers that provide parents with real-time clinical information from the electronic health record (EHR) at their hospitalized child's bedside.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Ryan Coller Coller identified the perspectives of parent, physician, nurse, and hospital administrator stakeholders on the anticipated benefits and challenges of giving parents access to physicians’ notes during hospitalization and strategies on how to implement the note sharing process most effectively.

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Co-designing to advance community health and health equity in Wisconsin: Building the Neighborhood Health Partnerships Program

Co-designing to advance community health and health equity in Wisconsin: Building the Neighborhood Health Partnerships Program

Engaging communities can increase the speed of translating health and health equity research into practice. Effective engagement requires a shared understanding of neighborhood health care quality and outcomes. Creating this shared understanding can be challenging without timely and accurate local health data, or ways to provide the data that are directly applicable to improving community health.

In this publication, authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Maureen Smith and Neighborhood Health Partnerships Program Director Jessica Bonham-Werling, discuss how an effective co-design strategy can lead to increased usability and adoption of CTSA resources, enabling a shared understanding of community health and ultimately leading to the successful translation of research into practice.

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Sustaining Gains in Diabetic Eye Screening: Outcomes from a Stakeholder-Based Implementation Program for Teleophthalmology in Primary Care

Sustaining Gains in Diabetic Eye Screening: Outcomes from a Stakeholder-Based Implementation Program for Teleophthalmology in Primary Care

Diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in the United States, primarily because of lack of access to eye screening. Teleophthalmology is a validated form of diabetic eye screening shown to prevent blindness but is significantly underutilized in U.S. primary care clinics.

In this article, authors including HIP Investigators Dr. Yao Liu and Dr. Maureen Smith hypothesized that stakeholder-based implementation program could increase teleophthalmology use and diabetic eye screening rates through improved integration of teleophthalmology into primary care workflows.

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Practice Guidelines for Ocular Telehealth-Diabetic Retinopathy, Third Edition

Practice Guidelines for Ocular Telehealth-Diabetic Retinopathy, Third Edition

The third edition of the Practice Guidelines for Ocular Telehealth-Diabetic Retinopathy includes fundamental requirements to be followed when providing medical and other health care services using telecommunication technologies, and any other electronic communications between patients, practitioners, and other health care providers, as well as “best practice” recommendations. These guidelines were co-authored by HIP Investigator, Dr. Yao Liu and aim to assist providers in pursuing a sound course of action in providing safe and effective medical care using telehealth tools based on current scientific knowledge, technological requirements, and patient needs.

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Health System Research Priorities for Children and Youth With Special Health Care Needs

Health System Research Priorities for Children and Youth With Special Health Care Needs

Children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) have, or are at an increased risk for, chronic physical, developmental, behavioral, or emotional conditions and also require health and related services of a type or amount beyond that required by children generally.

HIP Investigator, Dr. Ryan Coller et al. synthesized the opinions of a national multidisciplinary group of CYSHCN experts, including family caregivers, to prioritize research topics facing CYSHCN. Authors sought to take a foundational step toward developing a national research agenda for CYSHCN systems of care.

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Earlier Hospital Discharge With Prospectively Designated Discharge Time in the Electronic Health Record

Earlier Hospital Discharge With Prospectively Designated Discharge Time in the Electronic Health Record

Hospital discharge requires multidisciplinary coordination. Insufficient coordination impacts patient flow, resource use, and postdischarge outcomes. A team of authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Ryan Coller implemented a prospective, multidisciplinary discharge timing designation in the electronic health record (EHR) and evaluated its association with discharge timing.

The group found that the implementation of a prospective, multidisciplinary EHR discharge time designation was associated with more before-noon discharges. Next steps include replicating results in other settings and determining populations that are most responsive to discharge coordination efforts.

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FCR

System Factors Influencing the Use of a Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

System Factors Influencing the Use of a Family-Centered Rounds Checklist

Checklists are used to operationalize care processes and enhance patient safety; however, checklist implementation is difficult within complex health systems. A family-centered rounds (FCR) checklist increased physician performance of key rounding activities, which were associated with improved parent engagement, safety perceptions, and behaviors. To inform FCR checklist implementation and dissemination, a team of authors including HIP Investigator, Dr. Elizabeth Cox assessed physician compliance with this checklist and factors influencing its use.

Authors found that multiple factors within hospital systems may influence FCR checklist use. Strategies, such as providing rounding schedules and mobile computers, may promote optimal engagement of families during rounds and promote pediatric patient safety.

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Using Stakeholder Values to Promote Implementation of an Evidence-Based Mobile Health Intervention for Addiction Treatment in Primary Care Settings

Using Stakeholder Values to Promote Implementation of an Evidence-Based Mobile Health Intervention for Addiction Treatment in Primary Care Settings

Most evidence-based practices (EBPs) do not find their way into clinical use, including evidence-based mobile health (mHealth) technologies. The literature offers implementers little practical guidance for successfully integrating mHealth into health care systems. HIP Investigator, Dr. Andrew Quanbeck describes a novel decision-framing model that gives implementers a method of eliciting the considerations of different stakeholder groups when they decide whether to implement an EBP.

This paper presents a model implementers may use to elicit stakeholders' considerations when deciding to adopt a new technology, considerations that may then be used to adapt the intervention and tailor implementation, potentially increasing the likelihood of implementation success.

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D&I

Building Capacity for Dissemination and Implementation to Maximize Research Impact in a CTSA: The University of Wisconsin Story

Building Capacity for Dissemination and Implementation to Maximize Research Impact in a CTSA: The University of Wisconsin Story

The publication reports results of an 8-year process of stakeholder engagement aimed at buildingcapacity in Dissemination and Implementation (D&I) research at the University of Wisconsin as part of the National Institutes of Health’s Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA). HIP Investigators, Dr. Andrew Quanbeck and Dr. Maureen Smith et al. describe how CTSA leaders at UW built a comprehensive system designed to improve the health of the communities statewide by incorporating D&I concepts across the translational research spectrum.

The team also developed a toolkit on HIPxChange that describes resources and activities developed to build D&I capacity at UW’s Institute for Clinical and Translational Research.

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