D&I

Building Capacity for Dissemination and Implementation to Maximize Research Impact in a CTSA: The University of Wisconsin Story

Building Capacity for Dissemination and Implementation to Maximize Research Impact in a CTSA: The University of Wisconsin Story

The publication reports results of an 8-year process of stakeholder engagement aimed at building capacity in Dissemination and Implementation (D&I) research at the University of Wisconsin as part of the National Institutes of Health’s Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA). HIP Investigators, Dr. Andrew Quanbeck and Dr. Maureen Smith et al. describe how CTSA leaders at UW built a comprehensive system designed to improve the health of the communities statewide by incorporating D&I concepts across the translational research spectrum.

The team also developed a toolkit on HIPxChange that describes resources and activities developed to build D&I capacity at UW’s Institute for Clinical and Translational Research.

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MyHEART logo

Rationale and study design of the MyHEART study: A young adult hypertension self-management randomized controlled trial

Rationale and study design of the MyHEART study: A young adult hypertension self-management randomized controlled trial

To address the unmet need in hypertensive care for young adults, we developed MyHEART (My Hypertension Education And Reaching Target), a multi-component, theoretically-based intervention designed to achieve self-management among young adults with uncontrolled hypertension. MyHEART is a patient-centered program, based upon the Self-Determination Theory, that uses evidence-based health behavior approaches to lower blood pressure. Therefore, HIP Investigator, Dr. Heather Johnson and a team of investigators including Dr. Maureen Smith, evaluated MyHEART's impact on changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure compared to usual care after 6 and 12 months in 310 geographically and racially/ethnically diverse young adults with uncontrolled hypertension.

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Patient using tablet

Inpatients Sign On: An Opportunity to Engage Hospitalized Patients and Caregivers Using Inpatient Portals

Inpatients Sign On: An Opportunity to Engage Hospitalized Patients and Caregivers Using Inpatient Portals

Inpatient portals are online patient portals linked to electronic health records that provide hospitalized patients and caregivers secure access to real-time clinical information and tools to enhance their communication with providers and hospital experience. HIP Investigator, Dr. Ryan Coller et al. provided a perspective that inpatient portals are innovative tools poised to engage patients and caregivers during hospitalization and, thus, enhance patient-centered care. This article highlights the potential of using inpatient portals to engage hospitalized patients and caregivers and proposes next steps to evaluate this emerging technology.

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Veteran Engagement

Development of a veteran engagement toolkit for researchers.

Development of a veteran engagement toolkit for researchers.

Engaging patients in the planning, implementation and dissemination of research can increase the credibility and relevance of results and lead to higher quality, more patient-centered care. Veterans have unique experiences and healthcare needs, making their input on research related to their care particularly important. However, existing veteran engagement resources primarily focus on veterans who receive care through the Veterans Health Administration (VA). This excludes those veterans - the majority - who do not use the VA for healthcare.

To address the gap Dr. Nasia Safdar, Nicole Brys, and Dr. Jeff Whittle developed a veteran engagement toolkit that was informed by the work of both VA and non-VA researchers across the USA.

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Brainstorming with sticky notes

Bridging clinical researcher perceptions and health IT realities: A case study of stakeholder creep

Bridging clinical researcher perceptions and health IT realities: A case study of stakeholder creep

In an article co-authored by Drs. Edmond Ramly and Christie Bartels, the investigators describe "stakeholder creep," which resulted in a 3-month delay in go-live and increased work hours in a health information technology implementation project. The authors define stakeholder creep as not thoroughly identifying which stakeholders need to be involved and why before starting the project, and consequently not understanding the truee effort, skill sets, social capital, and time required to complete the project. In a root cause analysis, the team identified four main misconceptions that contributed to stakeholder creep. They developed a stakeholder planning tool, described in the article, that was perceived to be feasible and helpful in mitigating the effect of stakeholder creep.

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Young adult browsing the web

MyHEART: Development & dissemination of a patient-centered website for young adults with hypertension

MyHEART: Development & dissemination of a patient-centered website for young adults with hypertension

In this article, Dr. Heather Johnson and team discuss the development of the MyHEART website and toolkit for young adults with hypertension. The website and toolkit were implemented successfully with input from community and healthcare stakeholders to provide evidence-based education to a hard-to-reach population.

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doctor and patient shaking hands and smiling

PCOR: Brave new world meets old institutional policies

PCOR: Brave new world meets old institutional policies

recent article by PROKids team member Jessica Chung, et al., discusses the tensions between the engagement of patient stakeholders in research and the institutional and legal framework governing that engagement. Patient engagement during all stages of research has become increasingly common. Yet institutional policies, often intended to protect patients and research participants, are evolving to meet this new reality.

Chung, et al. lays out these tensions using examples from trial funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Institute and led by Dr. Elizabeth Cox, Director of PROKids. Quandaries arose when the values or preferences of patient stakeholders conflicted with institutional policies about background checks, letters about privacy breaches, and study reminders. 

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happy people surrounding happy baby in hospital

A family-centered rounds checklist, family engagement, and patient safety

A family-centered rounds checklist, family engagement, and patient safety

In a recent randomized clinical trial led by Dr. Elizabeth Cox, implementing a checklist during family-centered rounds increased family engagement and the safety of hospitalized children from the perspective of the families. The checklist was developed with input from the hospital staff and families of hospitalized children, and two items were found to significantly increase family engagement: when hospital staff read back orders, families engaged in more decision-making and provided more information, and families were also more engaged when the team talked about goals for discharge. The materials needed to implement the family-centered rounds checklist in are available in a free toolkit here.

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Colorectal cancer

PCP perceptions of colorectal cancer screening barriers

PCP perceptions of colorectal cancer screening barriers

Dr. Jennifer Weiss and team examined groups of PCPs based on their perceptions of screening barriers and the relationship to their patients' CRC screening rates to inform approaches for conducting barrier assessments prior to designing and implementing QI interventions. They found that high-performing PCPs can more effectively identify CRC screening barriers. Targeting high-performers when conducting a barriers assessment would assist in designing QI interventions for CRC screening.

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blood pressure measurement

"They're younger… it's harder." Primary providers' perspectives on hypertension management in young adults

"They're younger… it's harder." Primary providers' perspectives on hypertension management in young adults

Dr. Heather Johnson and team conducted a multicenter qualitative study to explore PCP perspectives on barriers to diagnosing, treating, and controlling hypertension among young adults with regular primary care. They found altered self-identity, greater blood pressure variability, and unintended consequences of medication initiation were barriers to hypertension control.

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