Skip to main content

UW Researchers Provide Health Systems with Information to Plan for Severe Complications from COVID-19

Family walking on pathWith the onset of COVID-19, the Health Innovation Program (HIP) determined they could use the reporting infrastructure they have been developing over the last several years, in partnership with Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality (WCHQ), to rapidly produce reports with reliable and accurate data for health systems who are WCHQ members. These reports can help the health systems to prepare for and respond to this pandemic.

The reports provide details on primary care provider panels, clinics, and ZIP codes for each health system and helps the health system to identify the numbers and prevalence of people who are at risk for severe complications from COVID-19.

UW Researchers Provide Health Decision Makers with Information to Plan for Severe Complications from COVID-19 by Zip Code, Health Conditions

Family walking on pathWith the COVID-19 pandemic, UW-Madison researchers within the School of Medicine and Public Health are quickly adapting to support Wisconsin health officials. Researchers at the Health Innovation Program (HIP), who have been working to improve health care using electronic health record data voluntarily provided by over 20 Wisconsin health systems through the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality (WCHQ), have mobilized to determine how they could rapidly use these data to help those on the front line of the battle against COVID-19 to support the direction of efforts towards the places in Wisconsin that need it most.

New 2019 Wisconsin Health Disparities Report and Appendix Available

WCHQ 2019 Wisconsin Health Disparities ReportReport Overview

The Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality (WCHQ), in collaboration with Health Innovation Program, developed the Wisconsin Health Disparities Report to identify where disparities in health outcomes and care exist in Wisconsin and to help inform and accelerate programs that are working to eliminate disparities.

Dr. Heather Johnson participates in the Wisconsin Hypertension Symposium and research cited in discussion of disparities

Heather JohnsonDr. Heather Johnson was recently invited to participate in the Wisconsin Hypertension Symposium, which brought together clinical providers, policy makers, health insurers, and state and national organizations such as the American Medical Association and the American Heart Association to develop action plans to improve hypertension diagnosis and control in Wisconsin. Dr. Johnson's research showing that young adults are less likely to be diagnosed and treated for hypertension was reference during the symposium to demonstrate disparities in hypertension care between populations in Wisconsin.

Heather Johnson raises awareness of heart health for African American women

Heather JohnsonDr. Heather Johnson recently served as the keynote speaker at the 7th Annual National Wear Red Day event at Fountain of Life Church. The goal of the event was to educate African American on the risk factors for cardiovascular disease and lifestyle changes that women can make to reduce their risk, and Wear Red Day also included networking and fellowship opportunities. The event was one of many across the nation for American Heart Month, "Go Red for Women."  Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death among American women over the age of 25, and African American women are disproportionately affected. 

Heather Johnson discusses masked hypertension

Heather JohnsonDr. Heather Johnson was recently featured in a local news story on "masked hypertension," a condition where blood pressure readings are normal when they are measured at the doctor's office, but are actually high in non-clinical settings due to stressful or fast-paced daily living. Masked hypertension is the opposite of "white coat hypertension," where anxiety about being in a clinical environment raises blood pressure temporarily. Masked hypertension can be difficult to diagnose and can result in long-term damage to the heart and kidneys, and is estimated to affect 10-15% of Americans. View the news story here.

MyHEART website launched to help young adults with high blood pressure

MyHEART LogoApproximately 1 in 15 young adults have high blood pressure, and they have lowest rates of blood pressure control compared to other adult age groups, putting them at risk for a future heart attack, stroke, congestive heart failure, and/or kidney disease. To help address this issue, Dr. Heather Johnson and her team recently launched a new website, MyHEART, that aims to help young adults with high blood pressure live a healthier life, lower their blood pressure, and prevent heart disease. A toolkit with information for providers and administrators about how they can use and promote the website with patients is also available.

Christie Bartels Awarded Pfizer Grant

Christie BartelsDr. Christie Bartels was recently awarded a 2.5 year Pfizer Independent Grant for Learning and Change for her project, "Systems-based CVD prevention protocols for rheumatology teams: A low-cost multidisciplinary approach." The goal of the project is to improve management of modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors as a path to improve the cardiovascular health and survival of patients with rheumatic diseases. The project will apply evidence-based staff-driven protocols in RA clinic visits to improve management of hypertension and tobacco use. This QI project responds to the aim of the Pfizer program to support "screening for and modification of modifiable CVD risk factors in RA patients."

Talking about Hypertension in Rheumatoid Arthritis

Christie BartelsIn research recently presented by Dr. Christie Bartels et al. at the American College of Rheumatology 2013 Annual Meeting, uncontrolled blood pressure was addressed in less than 1 of 3 rheumatology visits even when blood pressure exceeded 160/100 mmHg, despite the fact that patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased cardiovascular risk.

Read more on Medscape and Yahoo News.