Free-the-Data Program

Overview of the Program

As part of our mission to improve health care delivery and population health across the State of Wisconsin, the Free-the Data Program makes analysis-ready healthcare data available to UW-Madison faculty, staff, and trainees, and to UW Health staff for research and quality improvement purposes.

The program is currently in the pilot phase.  Data are available on individuals with chronic kidney disease or ischemic vascular disease, or who are eligible for pneumococcal vaccination, tobacco cessation counseling, or screening for osteoporosis, breast cancer, cervical cancer, and chronic kidney disease. 

Eligible faculty, staff, or trainees may apply to receive de-identified healthcare data.  Note that data are completely de-identified; no identifiable data will be provided. Some data are available without charge, while other data have a fee to cover development costs.  

To apply for these data, please use our free data request form

Once we approve your application, you will receive access to a web site with detailed documentation and additional instructions regarding obtaining IRB approval.  Upon receiving the IRB approval for your project, we will contact you to sign a Data Sharing Agreement and provide you with the data.  

 

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Site for Awardees

Site for Reviewers

Note: After you log in to the HIP website (under Log In on the navigation menu), all of your sites will be available under the My Communities menu.

Program Sponsors

HIP Logo

The Health Innovation Program (HIP) is a collective effort of UW Health and the UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health to expand resources for health services research for faculty, fellows, and students. HIP has expertise in the production of research-ready datasets from UW Health data.

 

PHINEX logo

The UW eHealth Public Health Information Exchange (PHINEX) is a joint project of SMPH’s Departments of Family Medicine and Pediatrics, led by Drs. Theresa Guilbert and Larry Hanrahan, with the goal of linking UW Health data to socio-economic and other community-level data to support broader public health research purposes.

 

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The Health Information Management Center (HIMC) is a shared service team across UW Health, charged with creating and maintaining an enterprise data warehouse. It stores UW Health data on quality of care that is publicly reported to the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality.

About the Populations Available

Every year UW Health submits measures of health care quality to the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality for inclusion in their public reports (www.wchq.org).  To learn where opportunities are to improve the quality of care, the Free-the-Data program makes available the de-identified datasets that are used to construct each of these quality metrics. 

Data are available on the quality of care delivered to individuals with certain chronic conditions, or who are eligible for certain preventive screenings (see below). Each dataset represents a population of individuals who were eligible for a specific quality metric.  For example, one dataset might include all women who were eligible for breast cancer screening, along with a field indicating whether or not each woman received a mammogram during the measurement period. 

Additional data elements are available for each of these populations (see the "Data Elements" tab).

More populations will become available over time; please check this web page for updates or email us at freethedata@hip.wisc.edu to learn about the availability of other data.

 

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Chronic Conditions Preventive Screenings
Chronic Kidney Disease, Stages I-III Osteoporosis Screening
Chronic Kidney Disease, Stages IV-V Pneumococcal Vaccination
Ischemic Vascular Disease Tobacco Cessation Counseling
  Breast Cancer Screening
  Cervical Cancer Screening
  Chronic Kidney Disease Screening

Chronic Kidney Disease, Stages I-III (N=1,521)

In recent years, chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a major public health issue. In order to improve outcomes for people who have CKD, a coordinated approach to care that involves slowing progression of kidney disease and evaluation and management of the patient's co-morbid conditions is required. Data are available for chronic kidney disease stages I-III for the following years: 2013 only.

Received an eGFR
Test

e-GFR yes 97%

Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) tests are considered the best test to measure a person's level of kidney function and determine the stage of kidney disease. The National Kidney Foundation recommends that patients receive, at minimum, one eGFR test per year. In this population, 97% of the patients with stage I-III chronic kidney disease received at least one eGFR test during the measurement year.

Most Recent BP <140/90 mmHg

BP Control

High blood pressure can lead to the onset or worsening of chronic kidney disease, and can also be a complication of chronic kidney disease. The National Kidney Foundation recommends that blood pressure be measured at every routine visit for CKD, and that it be less than 130/80 mmHg for persons with Stage I-III CKD. In this population, 52% of the patients with stage I-III chronic kidney disease had a blood pressure of <130/80 mmHg at their most recent blood pressure reading within the measurement year.

Received an LDL Cholesterol Test

LDL test

Heart disease is very common among patients with chronic kidney disease. Low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is the primary test that is used to screen for heart disease. The National Kidney Foundation recommends, at minimum, one LDL cholesterol test annually for patients with CKD. In this population, 77% of the patients with stage I-III chronic kidney disease received at least one LDL cholesterol test during the measurement year.

Most Recent LDL-C <100 mg/dL

LDL Control

Due to the role that high LDL cholesterol plays in heart disease and the fact that people with chronic kidney disease also frequently have heart disease, the National Kidney Foundation recommends that LDL cholesterol be <100 mg/dL for all patients with CKD in Stages I, II, or III. In this population, 53% of the patients with stage I-III chronic kidney disease had an LDL cholesterol level of 100 mg/dL or lower for their most recent test during the measurement period.

Chronic Kidney Disease, Stages IV-V (N=285)

Chronic kidney disease in Stages IV and V is marked by severely reduced kidney function, which requires careful assessment and management of kidney function, cardiovascular health, bone disorders, and disorders of calcium and phosphorus metabolism. As such, several tests and outcome measures are indicated for stage IV-V chronic kidney disease. Data are available for chronic kidney disease stages IV-V for the following years: 2013 only.

Received an eGFR
Test

eGFR CKD 4-5

Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) tests are considered the best test to measure a person's level of kidney function and determine the stage of kidney disease. The National Kidney Foundation recommends that patients receive, at minimum, one eGFR test per year. In this population, 98% of the patients with stage IV-V chronic kidney disease, excluding those with End Stage Renal Disease, received at least one eGFR test during the measurement year.

Most Recent BP <140/90 mmHg

BP CKD 4-5

Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease. The National Kidney Foundation recommends that blood pressure be monitored at every routine CKD visit and that it be less than 140/90 mmHg for patients with CKD Stages IV-V. In this population, 75% of the patients with stage IV-V CKD, excluding those with End Stage Renal Disease, had blood pressure <140/90 mmHg at their most recent blood pressure reading during the measurement period.

Received a Calcium
Test

Calcium CKD 4-5

Chronic kidney disease is associated with disorders of calcium metabolism, and the National Kidney Foundation recommends that patients receive at least one calcium test annually. In this population, 96% of the patients with stage IV-V chronic kidney disease, excluding those with End Stage Renal Disease, received at least one calcium test during the measurement year.

Received a Hemoglobin Test

Hgb CKD 4-5

Patients with stages IV-V chronic kidney disease are at risk for anemia due to the kidneys' inability to create the hormone erythropoietin, which is required for red blood cell production. The National Kidney Foundation recommends that patients with CKD have at least one hemoglobin test annually to screen for anemia. In this population, 84% of the patients with stage IV-V chronic kidney disease, excluding those with End Stage Renal Disease, received at least one hemoglobin test during the measurement year.

Received an iPTH Test

iPTH CKD 4-5

Secondary hyperparathyroidism is a common complication of chronic kidney disease due to hormonal and electrolyte imbalances. The National Kidney Foundation recommends that patients receive at least one intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) test annually. In this population, 46% of the patients with stage IV-V chronic kidney disease, excluding those with End Stage Renal Disease, received at least one iPTH test during the measurement year.

Received a Lipid Profile

Lipid CKD 4-5

Patients with CKD typically have altered lipoprotein metabolism, and cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients with CKD. The National Kidney Foundation recommends at least one lipid profile annually. In this population, 74% of the patients with stage IV-V chronic kidney disease, excluding those with End Stage Renal Disease, received at least one lipid profile during the measurement year.

Received a Phosphorus Level Test

Phosphorus CKD 4-5

Chronic kidney disease is associated with disorders of phosphorus metabolism, which can lead to bone, lung, eye, heart, and vascular issues. As a result, the National Kidney Foundation recommend that patients with CKD receive at least one phosphorus test annually. In this population, 46% of the patients with stage IV-V chronic kidney disease, excluding patients with End Stage Renal Disease, received at least one phosphorus test during the measurement year.

Ischemic Vascular Disease (N=2,920)

Ischemic vascular disease, including coronary and other atherosclerotic vascular disease, is the most common cause of death and is a major cause of hospital admissions. Evidence from clinical trials suggests that risk-reduction therapies should be used for patients with established ischemic vascular disease. 

Daily Aspirin or Other Antiplatelet Therapy

IHD Aspirin

Based on trials of secondary prevention therapies for patients with coronary and other atherosclerotic vascular disease, the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association recommends aspirin for all patients, unless contraindicated, as well as the use of other antiplatelet agents based on the disease type and clinical conditions.  In this population, 92% of the patients with ischemic vascular disease who were prescribed oral antiplatelet therapy during the measurement year. Data are available for the following years: 2012 only.

Most Recent BP <140/90 mmHg

IHD BP

High blood pressure is a major risk factor for ischemic vascular disease, in addition to other complications like stroke and renal failure. The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association recommend that blood pressure be measured at every routine visit, and that it be less than 140/90 mmHg. In this population, 80% of the patients with ischemic vascular disease had a blood pressure of <140/90 mmHg at their most recent blood pressure reading during the measurement year. Data are available for the following years: 2011-2012.

Received an LDL Cholesterol Test

IHD LDL Test

Elevated LDL cholesterol levels contribute to atherosclerosis, which in turn increase the risk of coronary events like heart attacks. The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association recommend that patients have at least one LDL cholesterol test per year. In this population, 84% of the patients with ischemic vascular disease received an LDL cholesterol test in the measurement year. Data are available for the following years: 2007-2012.

Most Recent LDL <100 mg/dL

IHD LDL Control

The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association recommend that LDL cholesterol be less than 100 mg/dL for all patients with ischemic vascular disease. In this population, 67% of the patients with ischemic vascular disease had a LDL cholesterol level <100 mg/dL at their most recent LDL test during the measurement year. Data are available for the following years: 2007, 2009-2012.

Preventive Screenings

Several preventive screening metrics are available, including osteoporosis screening, adults with pneumococcal vaccinations, adults using tobacco who received tobacco cessation counseling, breast cancer screening, cervical cancer screening, and chronic kidney disease screening.

Osteoporosis Screening (N=9,644)

Osteoporosis Screening

The risk for osteoporosis and fracture increases with age, as well as other factors. Bone density measurements can accurately predict the risk for fractures in the short-term, and the benefits of screening & treatment are of at least moderate magnitude for women who are at risk. In this population, 84% of women eligible for osteoporosis screening received a bone density screening in the measurement year. Data are available for the following years: 2008-2012.

Adults with Pneumococcal Vaccinations (N=21,736)

Pneumococcal Vaccine

Pneumococcal disease, like Streptococcus pneumoniae, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Among people over 65 years of age, the risk for complications, hospitalizations, and death from pneumococcus pneumonia are increased. In this population, 79% of adults over the age of 65 had a pneumococcal vaccination, which protects against Streptococcus pneumoniae. Data are available for the following years: 2007-2012.

Received Tobacco Cessation Counseling (N=13,283)

Tobacco Screening

Tobacco use is an extremely costly, yet avoidable cause of illness and death. Many patients who smoke report a desire to quit, and patients have expressed a greater satisfaction with health care when physicians assess and treat tobacco use. In this population, 55% of current smokers received tobacco cessation advice during the current measurement year. Data are available for the following years: 2010-2013.

Breast Cancer Screening (N=22,015)

Breast Cancer Screening

Evidence suggests that using mammography to screen for breast cancer reduces mortality, with a greater reduction in women aged 50-74 years old when compared to women 40-49 years old. Recommendations for breast cancer screening vary based on the patient's age and medical history. In this population, 82% of women who should have had at least one mammogram within the last 24 months received one. Data are available for the following years: 2006-2012.

Cervical Cancer Screening (N=49,384)

Cervical Cancer

Screening for cervical cancer reduces the incidence and mortality from the disease. The US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations vary based on a woman's age and medical history. In this population, 81% of the women who should have had one or more cervical cancer screening tests during the last 36 months, or one cervical cancer screening test and an HPV test within the last 5 years, received a screening test. Data are available for the following years: 2008-2012.

Chronic Kidney Disease Screening (N=22,461)

CKD Screening

The early stages of chronic kidney disease can be detected through screening, which can help prevent or delay adverse outcomes such as kidney failure, heart disease, and premature death. In this population, 88% of the patients with either diabetes or hypertension, excluding those who have chronic kidney disease and End-Stage Renal Disease, received an estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) test during the measurement year. Data are available for the following years: 2013.

About the Data Elements and Linkages

Datasets are available for specific populations eligible for chronic condition or preventive screenings. The data elements include the quality of care metrics, along with additional data elements (described below).

Data on Quality of Care Metrics

Data are available on individuals who are elgibile for the following quality of care metrics. Descriptions of these populations and the quality metrics available for each population can be found on the "Populations available" tab.

Chronic Conditions Preventive Screenings
Chronic Kidney Disease, Stages I-III Osteoporosis Screening
Chronic Kidney Disease, Stages IV-V Pneumococcal Vaccination
Ischemic Vascular Disease Tobacco Cessation Counseling
  Breast Cancer Screening
  Cervical Cancer Screening
  Chronic Kidney Disease Screening

Data Elements Available for All Populations

In addtion to the quality of care metrics for your specific population of interest, the following data elements are available at no additional charge for all populations:

  • Social and demographic characteristics: Age, gender, marital status, race/ethnicity, language, health insurance
  • Health behaviors: Body mass index (BMI), tobacco exposure
  • Chronic conditions: Indicator variables for more than 25 chronic conditions identified by Elixhauser, et al.* as important to predicting hospital length of stay, hospital charges, and in-hospital death
  • Outpatient visits: Count of total outpatient visits, primary care visits, and specialty visits
  • Primary Care Provider (PCP) information: Number of eligible individuals in that PCP's panel, PCP pseudo-identifier**
  • Clinic information: Count of MDs and DOs in the clinic; clinic pseudo-identifier**

*Chronic condition indicator variables identify the presence of an outpatient visit during or before the baseline year that had an ICD-9 diagnosis code indicating the chronic condition. Definitions are based on Elixhauser v3.3 (2008). For additional information, see the following references:
(1) Elixhauser A, Steiner C, Harris DR, Coffey RM. Comorbidity measures for use with administrative data. Medical Care 1998;36(1):8-27.
(2) Additional documentation and software available from Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) website: http://www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov/toolssoftware/comorbidity/comorbidity.jsp#download

**A pseudo-identifier is a unique random number representing each PCP or clinic that allows all individuals assigned to that PCP or clinic to be identified and grouped. Neither the PCP nor the clinic can be identified from this number.

 

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How to Apply to Obtain Data

Small data sets are useful as preliminary data for a grant application or for a research paper.  The Free-the-Data Program makes available without charge one year of de-identified data for one chronic condition or screening population for one quality metric.  Below we summarize the process.

Step 1: Application Submitted

Step 2: Application Reviewed

  • At least 3 reviewers assess the application according to the following criteria: 
    • the project is scientifically meritorious, and
    • the project is feasible with available data
  • Awardees will receive an email with a letter notifying them that their application has been approved or not. Occasionally, we may ask you to revise your application. 
  • Awardees will login to the Free-the-Data Community web site to obtain additional information, including a data dictionary and sample description.

Step 3: Awardee Meets IRB and HIPAA Requirements

  • Awardees will complete the appropriate requirements, as outlined in this table.

Step 4: Awardee Receives Data

  • Once IRB approval is received, awardees will be emailed a copy of the Data Sharing Agreement for review.
  • Awardees will contact freethedata@hip.wisc.edu to schedule a time to review the Data Sharing Agreement, sign it, and receive an encrypted copy of the data on CD-ROM.  A password to unencrypt the data will be emailed separately.

Step 5: Awardee Responsibilities

  • Store, use, and destroy the data as described in the Free-the-Data Data Sharing Agreement and your IRB application.
  • Submit a final report within 2 months of the project’s end date or within 12 months, whichever comes first.
  • Notify freethedata@hip.wisc.edu of any grants, publications, or other outcomes that arise from this work.
  • If asked, present findings at an invited seminar.

 

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Sample Materials

Following are several sample materials, including a sample dataset and data dictionary that explains how to interpret the data in the dataset. Additionally, a sample QI certification and a sample IRB exemption application are provided.

Please note that these data do not represent real patients; these materials are solely intended to provide an example of the materials you will work with for the Free-the-Data program.

Sample Data Request Form

Sample Dataset

Sample Data Dictionary

Sample QI Certification

Sample IRB Application

Funding Opportunities

The data available through Free-the-Data are a good fit for several funding opportunities available at the University.

Institute for Clinical and Translational Research Grant Program

The UW Institute for Clinical and Translational Science (ICTR) has several pilot programs, including the Community & Clinical Outcomes Research Pilot (formerly known as the Type 2 Translational Research Pilot). This program supports translational research that addresses the gap between what we know and what we do in clinical practice, community health programs, and health policy. For more information, visit the ICTR website.

Wisconsin Partnership Program

The Wisconsin Partnership Program offers several grant programs aimed towards improving the health of the people of Wisconsin. This includes the New Investigator Program that supports new faculty and the Collaborative Health Sciences Program that funds collaborative projects that cross the traditional boundaries of science and health.

UW Carbone Cancer Center Pilot Program

The UW Carbone Cancer Center (UWCCC) solicits applications for pilot studies twice a year, with the goal of fostering the development of basic, clinical, and population science research on cancer. For more information, visit the UWCCC website.

Alzheimer's Disease Research Center Pilots

The Alzheimer's Disease Research Center (ADRC) at the University of WIsconsin funds pilot studies on Alzheimer's disease and related illnesses. For more information, visit the ADRC website.

UW School of Medicine and Public Health Departmental Funds

Clinical departments within the UW School of Medicine and Public Health frequently have funding opportunities for faculty and trainees within the department. For more information, please consult your department's website or contact your department's research administrator.

 

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Text for Grants & Manuscripts

When your request for a dataset is approved, we will help streamline the grant writing process by supplying you with text describing the population and variables for use in grant proposals and/or manuscripts.

Custom Data

We can also develop custom data sets that include (1) more than one year of data, (2) more than one quality metric, (3) more than one chronic condition/screening population, and (4) linkage to other data sets such as the U.S. Census.  

These data have a fee structure to cover development costs.  To obtain a cost estimate, please complete our data application and cost estimate request. To obtain an informal quick estimate of the cost of your data request, please contact us at freethedata@hip.wisc.edu.  Please include in the email a description of the population(s) that you are interested in, the specific quality metric(s) and year(s) of data, and any proposed linkage(s) to other data. 

Optional Data Linkages

PHINEX Data

Applicants may request up to 20 data elements from the UW e-Health Public Health Information Exchange (PHINEX) program. These variables represent the socio-economic and environmental context of the patient's residence. Investigators who are interested in creating this linkage will meet with PHINEX staff for a consultation on which elements will be of greatest value.

PHINEX variables are available from the ESRI data at several levels of geography, such as state, county, ZIP code, tract, and others. Variables available fall into the general categories listed below. To receive the full list of available data elements, please email a request to freethedata@hip.wisc.edu. Note that additional time will be required to link to PHINEX data elements.

  • Socio-demographic information from Census 2010 & American Community Survey data
  • Population: Examples include age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, labor force
  • Households: Examples include total households, total family households, average household size
  • Income: Examples include household income, per capita income, age by income, disposable income, net worth
  • Housing: Examples include home value, owner-occupied units, renter-occupied units, vacant units
  • Business data, including Business Locations and Business Summary
  • Banking
  • Cable
  • Crime Indices
  • Shopping Centers
  • Traffic Counts
  • Consumer spending: Amount that households spend for products and services compared to national figures

2010 U.S. Census Data

Three U.S. Census Bureau-based variables are available for linkage to patient zip codes:

  • Percent of population zip code over the age of 25 with a high school degree or less
  • Median household income in zip code
  • Percent of zip code population with household income less than the Federal Poverty Level (FPL)

Rural-Urban Commuting Area Codes

Rural-Urban Commuting Area Codes (RUCAs) are a widely used measure of rural or urban status developed by the University of Washington. RUCAs utilize U.S. Census Bureau urbanized area and urban cluster definitions in combination with work commuting information to characterize zip codes as urban core, suburban, large town, or small town/isolated area. RUCA codes are linked to zip codes using a zip code approximation (zip code tabulation area (ZCTA) level of geography). See additional information at http://depts.washington.edu/uwruca/.

Area Deprivation Index

The area deprivation index uses census data to construct a geographic area-based summary of the socioeconomic deprivation experienced by a neighborhood. A version of this index has been constructed by HIP using 2000 census tract-level data. The index includes:

  • Population aged 25 and older with less than 9 years of education (%)
  • Population aged 25 and older with at least a high school diploma (%)
  • Employed persons aged 16 and older in white-collar occupations (%)
  • Median family income ($)
  • Income disparity
  • Median home value ($)
  • Median gross rent ($)
  • Median monthly mortgage ($)
  • Owner-occupied housing units (%)
  • Civilian labor force population aged 16 years and older who are unemployed (%)
  • Families below federal poverty level (%)
  • Population below 150% of the federal poverty threshold (%)
  • Single-parent households with children less than 18 years of age (%)
  • Households without a motor vehicle (%)
  • Households without a telephone (%)
  • Occupied housing units without complete plumbing (%)
  • Households with more than 1 person per room (%)

For additional information, see: Singh GK. Area deprivation and widening inequalities in US mortality, 1969-1998. American Journal of Public Health. 2003;93:1137-1143.

 

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Learn about Data Linkages

PHINEX

U.S. Census

RUCA

Area Deprivation Index

Frequently Asked Questions

Who is eligible to request data?
What can the data be used for?
What is included in the datasets?
In what format are datasets provided?
Can the data be linked to other datasets such as census data?
Where can I find out how variables were constructed?
What is the cost for datasets provided by the Free-the-Data Program?
How do I find a statistician to provide methodological expertise?
What if I have additional questions?

Who is eligible to request data?

Only UW-Madison faculty, staff, trainees, and UW Health staff may request data.  Other individuals are required to identify a UW-Madison or UW Health investigator who acts as the Principal Investigator for the project. You may identify a collaborator by requesting a consult through the Institute for Clinical and Translational Research.  

What can the data be used for?

We encourage the use of data for research, teaching, and improvement purposes. This can include large research projects or multi-investigator grants, peer-reviewed manuscripts, preliminary results and sample sizes, quality improvement or program evaluation projects, or teaching UW-Madison courses in healthcare or data analysis. 

What is included in the datasets?

Variables include whether the patient received the indicated chronic care or preventive screening within the year of measurement, along with baseline information on patient social and demographic characteristics, health behaviors, chronic conditions, outpatient visits, as well as limited information on providers and clinics. Multiple years of data are available. 

In what format are the datasets provided?

SAS or Stata datasets are available with variables formatted and clearly labeled.

Can the data be linked to other datasets such as census data?

Data are completely de-identified and cannot be linked to other datasets once delivered. However, linkage of data to other datasets such as census can be completed prior to de-identification and delivery of the data to the requestor. 

Where can I find out how variables were constructed?

A separate data dictionary is provided for ease of use. The data dictionary provides a summary description of how variables were constructed. Once you are awarded data, you will be provided a login to the Free-the-Data Community website, which includes additional information and detailed descriptions of individual variable construction. 

What is the cost for datasets provided by the Free-the-Data Program?

To facilitate small projects or preliminary data for a grant application, we will provide one year of data for one chronic care/screening outcome without charge. Fees to cover development costs are charged for requests that include (1) more than one year of data, (2) more than one quality metric, (3) more than one chronic condition or screening population, and (4) linkage to other data sets such as census data.

Applicants who are applying for grants from the Institute for Clinical and Translational Research will receive a 15% discount.  In addition, one multiple measures data set will be awarded without charge each calendar year for a quality improvement project sponsored directly by the UW Health Quality and Safety Innovations department.

To obtain an informal quick estimate of the cost of your data request, please contact us at freethedata@hip.wisc.edu.  A formal cost estimate will be provided as part of your approved data application.

How do I find a statistician to provide methodological expertise?

Projects that are research may request a Biostatistics consult from the Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (ICTR) Biostatistics & Research Design Resource at https://ictr.wisc.edu/bard.

What if I have additional questions?

If you have questions or need assistance, send us an email at freethedata@hip.wisc.edu

 

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