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Association of anxiety and depression with hypertension control

Association of anxiety and depression with hypertension control

This study by Dr. Heather Johnson's team aimed to evaluate rates and predictors of incident hypertension control among patients with anxiety and/or depression compared to patients without either mental health diagnosis. The 4-year retrospective analysis included patients over the age of 18 with hypertension. Those with anxiety and/or depression demonstrated more primary care and specialty visits than those without either condition. Other association of hypertension control included female gender, absence of tobacco use, Medicaid use, and a higher Adjusted Clinical Group Risk Score.

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Visit patterns for severe mental illness with implementation of integrated care

Visit patterns for severe mental illness with implementation of integrated care

This retrospective cohort pilot study by Meghan Fondow et al. examined visit patterns for over 1,000 patients with severe mental illness using EHR data from two federally qualified health centers. During the intervention period of a model that integrated behavioral health services with primary care, there was a significant increase in the proportion of visits per month. After the intervention, this rate declined but remained above pre-intervention period.

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Effects of Medicare Part D on guideline-concordant pharmacotherapy for bipolar 1 disorder among dually enrolled beneficiaries

Effects of Medicare Part D on guideline-concordant pharmacotherapy for bipolar 1 disorder among dually enrolled beneficiaries

Marguerite Burns et al. examined the effect of an insurance coverage transition that occured in 2006, which shifted coverage from Medicaid to Medicare Part D private drug plans for individuals who were enrolled in both programs. In this study, the authors investigated the receipt of guideline-concordant pharmacotherapy for biopolar I disorder after the transition and found that 16 months after the transition to Part D, the number of people with any recommended use of anti-manic drugs was higher than expected, and the number of ED visits per month temporarily increased by 19% immediately after the transition.

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The effect of Medicare Part D on the quality of pharmacotherapy for bipolar 1 disorder among dually enrolled beneficiaries

The effect of Medicare Part D on the quality of pharmacotherapy for bipolar 1 disorder among dually enrolled beneficiaries

In this article, Dr. Marguerite Burns et al. sought to determine whether the shift in 2006 from Medicaid coverage for medications to Medicare Part D for dually enrolled beneficiares affected psychiatric medication management. They examined Medicaid and Medicare administrative data and the effect of the coverage transition on receipt of guideline-concordant antimanic medication, antidepressant monotheray, and emergency department visits, and found that 16 months after the transition to Part D, the proportion of the population with any recommended use of antimanic drugs was 3.1% higher than expected, and the proportion of beneficiaries with antidepressant monotherapy was 2.1% lower than expected. The number of ED visits temporarily increased by 19% immediately post-transition.

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